conseil échevinal de la ville avec les invités sur le perron de la mairie
29.09.2022
Politics, policy and administration

On 10 September 1952, West German Chancellor and Foreign Minister Konrad Adenauer, Israeli Foreign Minister Moshe Sharett and World Jewish Congress President Nahum Goldmann met at Luxembourg City Hall to sign the Luxembourg Agreement – a historic agreement ratifying the reparations that West Germany was to pay the Jewish people and the State of Israel for the atrocities committed by Nazi Germany.

On Thursday, 29 September 2022, to mark the 70th anniversary of the signing of the Luxembourg Agreement, and in remembrance of that historic day, the City hosted an event at Luxembourg City Hall that culminated with the unveiling of a commemorative plaque. The plaque was unveiled by Ullrich Wilhelm Klöckner, the German ambassador to Luxembourg, Hadassah Aisenstark, the deputy chief of mission at the Israeli Embassy in Brussels, and Xavier Bettel, Prime Minister, in the presence of Luxembourg City Mayor Lydie Polfer.

The speakers thanked the City of Luxembourg and recalled the story behind the agreement. Mayor Lydie Polfer said that the City was proud and honoured to have played a role in the rapprochement between the State of Israel and Germany, and stressed the importance of continuing to promote the values of respect, tolerance, peace and liberty. She then presented the original table on which the agreement was signed. On the table were photographs and documents recalling the 10th of September 1952, as well as a reproduction of the treaty, which the German Federal Ministry of Foreign Affairs had generously loaned for the occasion. Next, Dr. Jens Hoppe, a representative of the Conference on Jewish Material Claims Against Germany, gave a talk on the inception and outcome of the Luxembourg Agreement.

To close the event, the guests were shown an excerpt from Roberta Grossman's film "Reckonings – The First Reparations", a documentary on the negotiations for Germany's payment of reparations to the Jewish people, culminating in the Luxembourg Agreement in 1952.